Last edited by Dailmaran
Tuesday, April 28, 2020 | History

1 edition of Alaska natives & the land. -- found in the catalog.

Alaska natives & the land. --

United States. Federal Field Committee for Development Planning in Alaska

Alaska natives & the land. --

  • 196 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off., Washington in Anchorage, Alaska .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Natural resources,
  • Indians of North America

  • Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE78 A3 U65
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiii, 565 p. :
    Number of Pages565
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26624042M


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Alaska natives & the land. -- by United States. Federal Field Committee for Development Planning in Alaska Download PDF EPUB FB2

The humongous volume Alaska Natives and the Land composes a page study of Alaska, its people, and natural resources by the Federal Field Committee on Development and Planning published 10 years after Alaska statehood in October When open on my desk the work spreads out well over two and a half feet.

Get this from a library. Alaska natives & the land. [United States. Federal Field Committee for Development Planning in Alaska.].

out of 5 stars Natives and the Land: Almost as Big as Alaska Reviewed in the United States on July 6, A massive compendium from authored by the Federal Field Committee for Development Planning in Alaska, which is just about the least sexy-sounding government agency ever.5/5(3).

This bibliography of books by Alaska Native authors accompanies a display at the Alaska State Library, in the Andrew P. Kashevaroff Building, to celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day and Alaska Book Week.

As such, it's not comprehensive. It's generally limited to titles available in our circulating : Freya Anderson. "Whatever the future holds, assuredly there will be change, brought about by passage of the Alaska Native Land Claims Act."-- Emil Notti, as President of the Alaska Native Foundation, in the Foreword to the edition of Alaska Native Land Claims.

Yuuyaraq: The Way of the Human Being by Harold Napoleon outlines the initial effects and continuing impact of the epidemics that afflicted Alaska Natives from the s through the s. Napoleon’s premise is that this death on a massive scale wiped out the culture-bearers and left psychological and spiritual scars that continue today.

Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future needs of the Native peoples, the State of Alaska Author: Robert D.

Arnold. Donald Craig Mitchell is a former vice president and general counsel of the Alaska Federation of Natives, organized by Alaska Natives in to fight for their historic land claims settlement.

In private practice sincehe has been intimately involved, both before Congress and in the courts, in the development and implementation of. This book is a unique historical review of the Alaska Native Land Claims process, even if it is somewhat dated. It gives the history of the claims issues and the methods by which land was allocated to the various native groups.

It should be recognized that changes the law since the book was published have made some parts of the book out of date.5/5(2). Alaska Natives or Alaskan Natives are indigenous peoples of Alaska, United States and include: Iñupiat, Yupik, Aleut, Eyak, Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, and a number of Northern Athabaskan cultures.

They are often defined by their language groups. Many Alaska Natives are enrolled in federally recognized Alaska Native tribal entities, who in turn belong to 13 Alaska Native Regional Corporations.

The settlement established Alaska Native claims to the land by transferring titles to twelve Alaska Native regional corporations and over local village corporations. A thirteenth regional corporation was later created for Alaska Natives who no longer resided in Alaska. The act is codified Alaska natives & the land.

-- book 43 U.S.C. et seq. 2 Effect of land conveyances. Sold American: The Story of Alaska Natives and Their Land, is an enlightening book. Very forthrightly told from the vantage point of someone who understands and can unpack the legaleze and political gaming of the characters who were involved in the Russian era, as well as later in the territorial era, and the effort toward statehood/5.

Books shelved as alaska-native-and-nunavut: Ancient Land: Sacred Whale by Tom Lowenstein, The People of the Polar North: A Record by Knud Rasmussen, Eski. Companion book, Windows to the Land, An Alaska Native Story, Volume One: Alaska Native Land Claims Trailblazers, is the voice of those whose fire in the belly led to today’s Tanana Chiefs Conference, the formation of the Alaska Federation of Natives, and to.

The book tells the story of how Congress dealt with the natives to settle claims when Alaska became a state. Complex developments set in when Alaska, under terms of the Statehood Act ofbegan choosing land ''in the public interest.'' The author gives a detailed history of the relevant.

Now in its third edition, Alaska Natives and American Laws is still the only work of its kind, canvassing federal law and its history as applied to the indigenous peoples of Alaska.

Covering throughthe authors offer lucid explanations of the often-tangled. TIMELINE FOR THE STRUGGLE OF ALASKA NATIVES FOR THEIR LANDS. DESIRED STUDENT OUTCOME: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the struggle of Alaska Natives for their land rights during the period from through STRATEGIES: As an introductory lesson to Text Three, have students skim quickly over the entire booklet.

Recently I’ve discovered another great way to listen to Alaska Native voices: books. Not books about Alaska Natives, but books they wrote.#OwnVoices books.

In the last month I read three different volumes of poetry by Alaska Native authors, and they each blew me away. Here are three Alaska Native poets for you to read ASAP because they’re just that amazing.

Established inthe UAA/APU Books of the Year program offers university and community members a chance to use shared texts to engage in conversations around critical themes.

The question of how to build community resilience is a hot topic now in communities around the world, including Anchorage. Lesson 3: Precontact: Alaska Natives and the Land Objectives Students will learn that: 1.

indigenous people in Alaska occupied and used the land for thousands of years, prior to. Written for students at the secondary level, this textbook on Alaska Native land claims includes nine chapters, eight appendices, photographs, maps, graphs, bibliography, and an index. Chapters are titled as follows: (1) Earliest Times (Alaska's first settlers, eighteenth century territories, and other claimants); (2) American Indians and Their Lands (the dispossessed, three centuries earlier Author: Robert D.

Arnold. Book review: “The Tanana Chiefs” shows how the history of Alaska Native political struggles rests solidly on the foundation set by a meeting of Tanana River Athabascan tribal leaders with.

Alaska was one of the last places in North America to be mapped and explored. As Raban well knows, the journey to Alaska can still be transformational.

• Read more top 10. Taylor said, in her mind, Alaska Natives are in a better position than Native Americans in the rest of the country because Alaska Natives own their land through corporations they control as.

The book is "Alaska Natives and American Laws", written by David S. Case and David A. Voluck, and published through the University of Alaska Press. This book is an extraordinary resource for those interested in how federal Indian law applies in Alaska. Alaska Facts. State Nick Name: "The Last Frontier" - the name Alaska is derived from the Aleut word "Aleyska," meaning "great land." State Motto: "North to the Future" State Capital: Juneau, located in the Southeast region of Alaska, has a population of 33, ( Estimate of Population, Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development.

The book included interviews with elders who experienced the legalized discrimination Natives faced, offering readers the chance to understand. The book Sold American: The Story of Alaska Natives and Their LandDonald Craig Mitchell is published by University of Alaska Press.

Beginning the Special Relationship and Events Leading to the Settlement of Land Claims Early Education and Effects of the Nelson Act () Early Alaska Native Land Cases and Acts Citizenship: United States, State of Alaska, Tribal Indian Reorganization Act () Cohen’s Handbook of Federal Indian Law, Case’s Alaska Natives and American Laws World War II Indian Country Statute (   But attempts at the annual convention of the Alaska Federation of Natives here to begin a lobbying effort have been hindered by disputes among the natives over how best to protect the land.

Alaska Native Foundation, - History - pages 0 Reviews Textbook for upper secondary level giving a history of Alaska and the native land claims settlement. Natives: Alaska Native Communities on Harriman's Route. Excerpted from The Native People of Alaska by Steve J.

Langdon, published by Greatland Graphics, Anchorage, Used with permission. In Baranov, concerned by the sight of non-Russian Europeans trading with the natives in southeast Alaska, established Mikhailovsk six miles (10 km) north of present-day Sitka. He bought the land from the Tlingit, but inwhile Baranov was away, Tlingit from a neighboring settlement attacked and destroyed l: Novo-Archangelsk.

‘Windows to the Land’ opens the door for Native stories Addley Fannin, Book Review the focus to the broad new topic of Alaska Natives’ relationship with the land itself, their personal.

Digest of Federal Resource Laws of Interest to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 USC ) -- Public Lawapproved Decem (85 Stat. ), and repeatedly amended, authorized Alaska Natives to select and receive title to 44 million acres of public land in Alaska, and $, in cash as.

Alaska Natives typically define subsistence more fundamentally than non-Natives. For most Natives, subsistence is synonymous with culture, identity, and self-determination. As Nelson Frank, a Haida from southeast Alaska put it in his testimony before the Alaska Native Review Commission (recorded in the book Village Journey by Thomas Berger).

The th Anniversary of the Treaty of Cession with Russia provides an opportunity to examine what the purchase of Alaska meant for Alaska Natives. The language of the treaty demonstrates how the United States and Russia thought about, classified, and legally established the conditions of.

Just as complex was the creation of a statewide body that could elect delegates to represent the interests of all Alaska Natives. The need and desire of the oil companies and the state to build a pipeline to access the oil, a pipeline which would have to cross prospective Native lands, prompted the final Alaska Native Land Claims Settlement, ANCSA.

Alaska Natives on the same basis as American Indians else-where (Cordes ). The next significant legislation concerning the federal-Native relationship was the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of Alaska Native aboriginal land claims date back to when the Tlingits of Southeast Alaska protested the saleFile Size: 1MB.

The Alaska Natives Commission (officially, the Joint Federal-State Commission on Policies and Programs Affecting Alaska Natives) was created by Congress in at the urging of Alaska Native groups. The Commission's undertaking was jointly funded by the federal government and the State of Alaska.

Alaska (/ ə ˈ l æ s k ə / (); Aleut: Alax̂sxax̂; Inupiaq: Alaasikaq; Alutiiq: Alas'kaaq; Tlingit: Anáaski; Russian: Аляска, romanized: Alyaska) is a state located in the northwest extremity of the United States West Coast, just across the Bering Strait from exclave of the U.S., it borders the Canadian province of British Columbia and territory of Yukon to the east and Before statehood: Territory of Alaska.Alaska Natives The Real Alaska Natives.

The indigenous peoples of Alaska, known as Alaska Natives, have varied cultures and have adapted to harsh environments for thousands of years. They are as far north as Barrow (Utqiagvik) and as far south as Ketchikan.

Natives are indigenous peoples of Alaska: Iñupiat, Yupik, Aleut, Eyak, Tlingit, Haida."Subsistence' is the word used to describe a traditional way of life among many Alaska Natives.

In a physical sense, it refers to the practice of relying on the surrounding environment as a source.